Historical society plans luncheon

DOWNEY - The Downey Historical Society will host a luncheon June 26 at the Rio Hondo Event Center.Reservations are $20 and can be made by writing to the historical society at P.O. Box 554, Downey CA 90241. For more information, call (562) 862-2777.

********** Published: June 17, 2010 - Volume 9 - Issue 9

Downey Daily Photos

All Worn Out: I'm accustomed to seeing gatherings of classic cars in Downey. The cars are well cared for, shiny in the extreme. This '53 Chevy, on the other hand, looks and probably feels her age. I hope someone is going to take care of her and get her all spiffed up and ready for a night out on the town.The Downey Patriot will periodically feature photos and commentary from photographers Pam Lane, Joan Anderson and Allison Mansell, creators of DowneyDailyPhotos.com.

********** Published: June 17, 2010 - Volume 9 - Issue 9

Mariah Montero

Mariah Montero addressed her fellow scholars during a Griffiths Middle School Honors Night ceremony June 10 at First Baptist Church of Downey. Mariah is an honor student, maintains a 4.0 GPA and has received the Stauffer Scholar Award. As a Cadette Girl Scout, she earned the Silver Award. She was also a member of the Downey Dolphins swim team and the Downey Silver Cherries All-Star cheer squad and represented them at Nationals. Mariah is also an active participant with Keep Downey Beautiful clean-ups and is a member of the Assisteens service club sponsored by the Assistance League of Downey. ********** Published: June 17, 2010 - Volume 9 - Issue 9

Learn to swim this summer

DOWNEY - Young children can learn how to swim at the Downey Aquatic Center, located at Downey High School, this summer.Two-week sessions of Mommy/Daddy and Me classes will be offered June 28-July 9, July 12-23, July 26-Aug. 6 and Aug. 9-20. The class is for children ages six months to three years, and is designed to orient children to the water where they will begin to learn basic safety skills, breath control, floating, kicking and paddling. A parent or guardian must participate in the water with the child. Up to two adults per child are permitted in the water. Sessions are 30 minutes each and are held at noon, 5 p.m. and 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Cost is $50. An Introduction to Water class for children ages 3-5 is also two-weeks long and $50. This beginning class is for the young swimmer. Students will learn breath control, floating and the fundamentals of self-propulsion. Introduction to front crawl and swimming on the back is also covered. Sessions are 30 minutes long and are held at 9, 10 and 11 a.m., noon, and 5 and 6 p.m. Learn to Swim is a class for children ages 6-15. Swim lessons are in accordance with Red Cross guidelines. The two-week session is also $50. For more information on the classes, call (562) 904-7238.

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Teacher at Arc earns WHO Award

DOWNEY - Donna Lindley-Hoskins has been selected to receive the WHO Award from the Downey Education Association.The WHO (We Honor Ours) Award is given to a colleague "in recognition of their outstanding contributions to education, their involvement in the community as well as their dedicated and active participation in their local teachers' organizations." Lindley-Hoskins has worked at Downey Adult School since 1976, beginning as a children's aide. When she received her teaching credential two years after, she was assigned to a classroom at Arc to teach people with intellectual disabilities. "Donna has dedicated her life to improving the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. She continues to seek ongoing education and new ways to meet their needs and encourage their individual development," a press release announcing the award says. Lindley-Hoskins recently completed a 12-weekend course for special education advocacy training through the National Special Education Advocacy Institute. She said working with Arc has proved her the opportunity "to serve others in countless and sometimes unusual ways." "Teaching someone something that will make their life better and watching them use that skill daily from that point on is incredibly rewarding," she said. Over the years, Lindley-Hoskins said she witnessed numerous changes to the services provided to people with special needs. Two years ago, she represented Arc on a trip to China. The experience reminded her "just how far we have come in making a difference in the lives of others, and also how much further we need to go to overcome some of the barriers people with special needs and their family members face." Lindley-Hoskins holds a Bachelor's degree in Vocational Arts from Cal State Long Beach. She is a member of the DEA Board of Directors - Special Segment No. 6, as well as a member of the Bargaining Committee and Scholarship Committee. She also serves as treasurer of the Lakewood Christian Schools Parent Teacher Fellowship. "It is her love of people and her vision that has brought the adult special classes programs at Arc to new heights in educational and vocational opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities," the press release said.

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Cats up for adoption

HAWTHORNE - The South Bay Pet Adoption Center in Hawthorne will host a cat and kitten adoption event July 17 from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.Vendors will be exhibiting new products and services, and radio station 100.3 The Sound will provide the music. For more information, call (310) 676-1149.

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Recycle used motor oil at Kragen

DOWNEY - Residents can dispose of their used motor oil and filters - and receive a free oil filter in exchange - at a used oil collection event June 26 at Kragen Auto Parts, 7839 Firestone Blvd.Used motor oil and oil filters can be dropped off from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Everyone who brings in a used oil filter will receive a coupon for one free Frahm oil filter. Coupons are only redeemable during the event. City staff will also be distributing free used oil recycling kits and other promotional materials. For more information, call (562) 944-4766.

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Video sale at library

DOWNEY - The Friend's Gift Shop inside the library has slashed the price of its videos.Normally $1, videos are now on sale for 50 cents, while supplies last.

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Is public broadcasting putting a hurt on the arts?

What is the role of public broadcasting in today's society? That's a question that Congressman Doug Lamborn wants an answer to. He is proposing to slash the $420 million budget of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB).The CPB proclaims its mission is to "provide programs and services that inform, enlighten, and enrich the public. CPB has particular responsibility to encourage the development of programming that involves creative risks and that addresses the needs of unserved and underserved audiences, particularly children and minorities." Really. Children and minorities lack programming? Someone should get the word out to Harry Potter, Optimus Prime, and Hannah Montana. Or to Black Entertainment Television and Spanish media giants Univision and Telemundo that actively seek minority audiences on the air and have grown in the marketplace. Somehow, these audiences are, according to official government proclamation, "unserved and underserved". In fact, there are literally thousands of television and radio stations that "inform, enlighten, and enrich the public" that involve "creative risks," and which reach tens of millions of Americans. The arts, news and entertainment industries are multibillion dollar operations - $480.6 billion a year, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis - that have seen proliferation in the past fifty years unprecedented in human history. The public votes every day with their clickers, and they are without a doubt far better patrons of the arts than government ever has been. According to Lamborn, the CPB receives about 13 percent of its funding from Congress: $420 million. That means that its total budget is about $3.23 billion, comprising less than 1 percent of the market share of the entire industry. The $420 million taxpayer financing hardly even registers in the industry, comprising less than the $460 million it reportedly took to produce and promote James Cameron's latest blockbuster, Avatar. It was not always so. For centuries, the arts and other media depended upon government benefactors - aristocrats, and monarchs that commissioned paintings, frescoes, symphonies, operas, and other state-funded propaganda - a fact often cited by supporters of public broadcasting and other entities like the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities (NEA & NEH). In truth, the aristocratic patronage of the arts was primarily for powerful families to gratify themselves and to promote their rules. The arts were luxuries for the powerful, not necessarily for public consumption. They were of course financed by taxpayers. In antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance, visible forms of propaganda were limited to architectural feats: palaces, bridges, churches, and also statues and sculpture, arenas, and theaters. And also to public forums, parades, performances and pageantry, which were all places for the distribution of propaganda, usually transmitted orally or through signage. Today, the goals of public broadcasting have really not changed all that much, for they still serve a propaganda purpose. However, today there is a paternalistic, statist twist. The degree of public financing is utilized by elitists to claim to represent "unserved and underserved" communities. So, they're welfare programs for what may otherwise be unsuccessful arts. Or would they be unsuccessful without government backing? In fact, government expenditure into public broadcasting, the arts, and humanities distorts the marketplace, and may even be weakening the appeal of these classical art forms within the marketplace. These art forms, whether they be classical music, historical documentary films or other performing arts, are probably underserved and underfunded by government backing, which given its not-for-profit model, drives practically no capital back into those art forms compared to the private sector. It also puts out next to no mass marketing on their behalves, a necessary component to competing in the arts and entertainment industries. Instead, where they might otherwise be thriving, the classic art forms are government dependents. It's time for the arts to break out of the antiquarian, Medieval notion that government is their most prolific benefactor. It is not. The people who comprise the market are, as is evidenced by the widespread success of the privately-funded movies, television, and music industries. One of the reasons for "starving artists" is because in so many of the art forms, the government has claimed a practical monopoly. Minus these government-created outlets - like public broadcasting, the NEA, and the NEH - those same artists would be vigorously competing privately for profit in a much larger marketplace determined by the demand for their arts rather than government subsidy of them. Robert Romano is the senior editor of ALG News Bureau.

********** Published: June 17, 2010 - Volume 9 - Issue 9

Planning for an Emergency… Week 10

Well here we are, it's Dads and Grads weekend. It's amazing how fast time goes by and how things change. Another outstanding group of young people are moving-on to the next step of their lives. For Dads, this also means their teachings may soon be tested. Last month I wrote about Moms being some of the earliest emergency preparedness planners. We would be remiss if we didn't add dads to the early emergency preparedness planner list as well.It is true that dads may not be alone in influencing us to bring our jackets and encouraging us to pack emergency supplies. However it is true that Dads are generally the experts for checking things on our cars and around the house. Where would we be if someone didn't check the oil, coolant and brake fluid in the car (or train us to do this)? How about exercising the main water shut-off for our house or checking the roof before winter hits us with lots of rain? What about keeping a supply of camping equipment? Again, this is usually a task that falls on dad's shoulders. Certainly there are exceptions to this. But many believe dads show their love for their families by performing the mundane service work on the cars and houses. This 'show the love' theme is a good one for emergency preparedness. I recently listened to a speaker who opined many in our society are not motivated by fear ( i.e. earthquakes and other disasters). Instead, the good speaker noted that the love of others is an important motivator as well. So this week when we are following through with our emergency preparedness efforts, let's consider the message we are sending. We prepare our families and workplaces for emergencies so we can 'prosper' after an emergency. Prosper, in this sense, means to 'succeed' in our recovery. What better way to show you care than to help someone or a family be more prepared for an emergency? By the way, emergency preparedness supplies make great gifts for dads and grads. Almost everyone can use an emergency supply car-pack or a hand-crank radio, budget permitting. This week let's continue our preparedness strategy. Let's focus on obtaining supplies, developing our emergency plans and learning more about our local hazards. This week let's buy or obtain the following supplies: •one large can of juice per person •two (2) rolls of toilet paper per person •one large box of plastic food bags •one box of quick-energy snacks •one medicine dropper (good for treating water) For planning purposes, locate two nearby pay phones and store a supply of quarters for emergency phone calls at home, in your car and at work. These days, payphones are not as easy to find. Be sure your family knows where the payphones are located and, of course, how to use them. With so many young people having cell phones now, many may not consider payphones as a means of communication. You may also need a hard-copy list of contact numbers for your family and colleagues at work. Don't forget to have an out of state phone number and contact person listed as well. Keeping with the phone theme, if you don't already know how to text message with your cell phone, you should learn how to send and receive messages. Immediately after an emergency the 'hard-wire' phone system is typically impacted. Frequently the problem is caused by the large number of people who want to call someone and talk about the emergency. While it's natural to want to 'share' experiences and to check on others, the best use of the phone system after an emergency is to leave it alone unless you are reporting an emergency. Take the time, immediately after an emergency, and check on your family, co-workers and the structures around you. If you find a problem, see if you can address it immediately. This is where our preparedness efforts really pay off. Consider using text messages to contact others as these messages frequently get through the cell phone system when voice communications are not yet functioning properly. Be safe out there…Questions or comments can be sent to ready@downeyca.org. Mark Sauter is deputy city manager in charge of emergency preparedness for the city of Downey.

********** Published: June 17, 2010 - Volume 9 - Issue 9

Family to renew faith

DOWNEY - The public is invited to view a reiteration of faith ceremony June 25 when the Benevides family, immigrants from Portugal, rejoin the Jewish faith.The ceremony will take place at Temple Ner Tamid at 7:30 p.m. For more information, call (562) 861-9276.

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Funeral set for Thomas Aman

DOWNEY - Thomas R. Aman, 70, died June 8 in his Downey home of leukemia.He was born Nov. 2, 1939 in Richardton, N.D. Being one of 10 children, Aman never had children of his own, but was a stepfather and grandfather to his three step-daughters and grandchild. A graveside service is scheduled for June 18 at 11 a.m. at Rose Hills Memorial Park, gate 14.

********** Published: June 17, 2010 - Volume 9 - Issue 9

Political leaders

Dear Editor:Surely this can't be the change the majority of the people who voted for President Obama wanted. Did you want the U.S. to have a $13 trillion deficit or $100 trillion unfunded entitlements, i.e., Social Security, which is now in the red, Medicare, MediCal and government pensions, etc. with no way to pay for all of them? It is projected that in less than 10 years the national debit will be 90 percent of our gross national product. Are you aware that in 2011 the Bush tax cuts will expire? Cap and trade are before the Senate now. This horrible legislation will cause all energy prices to go up. Obama has said it will cause electricity to skyrocket, all utilities will go up, gasoline prices will rise and now they're talking about a value added tax. The worst part of cap and trade is energy will be put under the U.N.; we will be forced to buy carbon credits. Of course, Al Gore, who has perpetrated this hoax, along with others, can afford to buy them. I doubt candles light his five or six homes, and I'm sure his Gulf Stream airplane still uses fossil fuel. All this and more is going on while California has 9 percent unemployment, and in some areas as high as 12 percent. Did you want $500,000 spent to study where the stimulus package was spent? Did you want $400,000 to be sent to Palestine (the Hamas) to improve their water supply and to build and improve their schools? Of course, the San Joaquin Valley lost many crops because they had no water, and we all are aware that here teachers are being dismissed and class sizes are being increased. These elected officials who are supposed to represent us or were put in office because we thought they understood why we put them there apparently haven't the ability to understand that the U.S. can't sustain this obscene debt. I believe they are deliberately trying to take our country down to the level of poverty of other countries. This way we can be put under a One World Government. It's all about power and money. If this administration didn't like the U.S., why didn't they leave and run for office in some communist or progressive country where they want the government to pay for everything from cradle to grave, and destroy it with deep debt? - Elsa Van Leuven, Downey

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Crime Report

Thursday, June 10At 11:30 a.m., a residential burglary occurred in the 7600 block of 4th Street. A witness wrote down the license number of the car the suspects were driving. Officers traced the license number to a home in Bell Gardens where they arrested a 19-year-old male and a 16-year-old female. Detectives have also linked some of the property found inside the home to a residential burglary that occurred in the 10600 block of Old River School Road on June 2nd. At 11:30 a.m., officers arrested a 27-year-old Downey man after he attempted to break into a vehicle parked in the 9600 block of Adoree. The suspect was stopped by officers as he was about to enter the Lakewood Boulevard Metro link Train Station. He was arrested for attempted vehicle burglary. Friday, June 11 At 1:30 p.m., a resident returned to her home in the 10200 block of Priscilla to find that her home had been burglarized. The suspect(s) stole numerous items of jewelry and electronics. Saturday, June 12 At 8 a.m., Kaiser Hospital (9333 Imperial) reported that someone stole a computer from one of their examination rooms. Detectives are continuing their investigation to identify a suspect. At 8:30 a.m., a 23-year-old "parolee at large" was arrested at his mother's home in the 9100 block of Songfest after he assaulted his girlfriend. The suspect temporarily barricaded himself in the home's attic, but ultimately surrendered without incident. He was booked for felony assault - Domestic Violence. Sunday, June 13 At 4:30 a.m., a citizen reported a garage fire in the 8600 block of Springer. There were no injuries. Investigators believe the fire was intentionally ignited and an arson investigation is being conducted to identify a suspect. Tuesday, June 15 At 11:35 a.m., a 17-year-old male was arrested for a petty theft at the Radio Shack on Florence Avenue. The suspect was apprehended by two customers who were able to detain him until police arrived. At 4:20 p.m., officers received a report of several juveniles spray painting walls at Crawford Park. Officers detained several individuals and ultimately arrested one juvenile for being in possession of spray paint. He was charged with vandalism and released to the custody of his parents. At 4:45 p.m., Gang Detectives were patrolling Treasure Island Park when they saw five male juveniles seated on a park bench. As the detectives walked toward them, the juveniles attempted to run away, but were quickly detained. It was subsequently determined one of the subjects was in possession of brass knuckles. He was arrested and booked for the weapons charge. Courtesy Downey Police Department. Report crimes in progress by calling 911.

********** Published: June 17, 2010 - Volume 9 - Issue 9

Medical seminars at LRMC

LAKEWOOD - Lakewood Regional Medical Center will host two free medical seminars next week.On June 22, Dr. Viken Konyalian will lead a seminar titled "Common Surgical Concerns - Gallstones and Hernia." The doctor will discuss "everything you want to know but were afraid to ask." Konyalian's meeting is from 6-7:30 p.m. On June 26, Dr. Joseph Song will lead a workshop titled "Cardiovascular Disease 101." Visitors will learn how developing a healthy lifestyle can potentially save your life. Topics in modifying behaviors and risk factors of cardiovascular disease will also be discussed. The meeting is from 2-4 p.m. RSVP for either seminar by calling (800) 813-4345.

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Ska band to play Stardust

DOWNEY - Wisecracker, a popular ska-punk band popular in Germany, will perform at the Stardust in Downey on July 14.Lyrically, Wisecracker switches from English to Spanish to German. The band's music has been compared to that of Sublime and Iron Maiden. They recently released their fourth album, "The Pact." The Stardust is located at 7643 Firestone Blvd.

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