Friday morning report, July 3

Five things to know this Friday morning: 

1.) July 4 is going to sound like a war zone in Downey, and I don't use those words lightly.

Calvary Chapel is not hosting their community fireworks show this year, leaving Cerritos as the the only professional fireworks display near Downey. The Downey Police Department's non-emergency line is (562) 861-0771, but keep in mind they will be overwhelmed with calls Saturday night. 

SEAACA is closed tomorrow, but the county animal shelter on Garfield Avenue will be open to process lost and found pets. 


2.) Norwalk will have a fireworks show tonight on the civic center lawn. It's free and first-class (just too bad that it's on a Friday). 


3.) Downey football player Darrian Franklin has committed to Oregon, and it has the Beaver State pretty excited. 

From FishDuck.com: "[The] Los Angeles area is now as much Thunder Green and Lightning Yellow as it is the feuding colors of burgundy and powder blue. Franklin is the type of player with immediate impact capability. Hard hits and quick movements to the ball only scratch the surface as to his athletic promise."


4.) Author and filmmaker Betsy Chasse will speak at the Downey Church for Spiritual Living on Aug. 16.

Chasse is the co-writer, co-director, and co-producer of the indie film, "What the Bleep Do We Know!?" She is also the author of "Tipping Sacred Cows "and produced the "Song of the New Earth" that premiered at the Seattle International Film Festival. 


5.) Gangs Out of Downey has announced the recipients of its Friendship Award, which is awarded annually to two students each at Warren, Downey and Columbus high schools. 

This year’s recipients include Miranda White and Gregory Garcia (Warren); Lizbeth Velasquez and Ulissess Anguiano (Downey); and Ashley Rodriguez and Curtis Gipson (Columbus). 

Each of the recipients received a Gangs Out of Downey plaque and $100. 

Gangs Out of Downey began issuing the Friendship Award in the mid-1990’s after the Los Angeles Riots. The students are chosen for their ability to “bridge the gap of miscommunication between their peers, serving as true ambassadors of understanding and friendship.”